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Hiking and Backpacking the Escalante-
Coyote Gulch, the Slots and
the Escalante River



Below are a few of the many opportunities for hikes and backpacks in the Escalante region.

The Escalante River from Moody Canyon Trailhead to Coyote Gulch and Back
The Escalante River from Highway 12 up 25 Mile Wash to early Weed Bench
Coyote Gulch Backpack
Horse Canyon to the Escalante to Little Death Hollow
Spooky Gulch and Peek-A-Boo Gulch

Hiking in the Escalante

The Escalante region has some very remote locations. It encompasses 1.9 million acres of land. If you are looking for an isolated location for a solo trip, this may be the place.

The Escalante region can be accessed from the towns of Escalante, Boulder, Cannonville, Big Water, Kanab, or from the east side through Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. I recommend visiting the town of Escalante, and especially the Escalante BLM office. At the BLM office you can get questions answered, buy maps, and obtain a backcountry permit. They are located at 755 West Main Street and are open 7 days a week, from 07:30 to 5:30 p.m. mid-March through mid-November. The rest of the year they are open 7 days a week from 08:30 to 4:30 p.m. Their phone number is 435-826-5499.The Utah BLM website for the Escalante region offers an overview of the area and has contact information and hours for the other BLM offices. Note that backcountry permits are required and fires are not allowed in the canyons.

Popular hikes in the area include the short slot canyons called Peek-A-Boo Gulch and Spooky Gulch and backpacking in Coyote Gulch, accessed from the Town of escalante down Hole in the Rock Road. Little Death Hollow is a longer slot canyon accessed from the Burr Trail which runs east to west through the northen part of the Monument.

The Trails Illustrated 1:75,000, Canyons of the Escalante, map number 710, is a great planning map for the area.

General Information

The town of Escalante, along with the town of Boulder about 30 miles north, is one of the starting points for treks in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. There are a number of gas stations/convenience stores in the town, with the Phillips 66 gas station in the town's center having a hose bib to fill water cans. But it may be turned off inside the station. Another water point is the town park located around the corner at 100 North and Center Streets. There you will find shaded tables and bathrooms as well. The Pioneer Information Center is across the street form the Phillips 66. They can provide you with local information and history. There are a number of small cafe's as you head through town on Main Street (Highway 12). You can find coffee and food at a number of them including Escalante Outfitters, at 39 West Main Street. Griffin Grocery is at 30 West Main Street and is the only grocery store in town.

Be sure to stop and take a look at the Kiva Koffeehouse, on highway 12 at mile marker 73.86, north of Escalante on the way to Boulder (it is just aroudn the corner from the Highway 12 Escalante River trailhead). They are open April through October, from 0830 to 4.30 pm, and are closed Tuesdays. They have great drinks, and it is worth the stop just to walk through the structure.They offer meals and overnight accommodation.


Click for Escalante, Utah Forecast


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